Fluoroscopy

Fluoroscopy is a technique that shows a continuous x-ray of the body like an x-ray movie, enabling the radiologist to view X-rays in real time.

Fluoroscopy enables radiologists to assess many body systems including bones, joints, lungs, the digestive and urinary tracts, and the reproductive system.

  • WHAT IS FLUOROSCOPY?

    Fluoroscopy is a technique that shows a continuous x-ray of the body like an x-ray movie, enabling the radiologist to view X-rays in real time.

    Fluoroscopy enables radiologists to assess many body systems including bones, joints, lungs, the digestive and urinary tracts, and the reproductive system. Contrast media, such as barium sulphate and iodine-based dyes are used to fill the area of interest, or outline soft tissue organs for more detailed visualisation and improved assessment.

  • BEFORE A FLUOROSCOPY SCAN

    The preparation prior to the scan is dependant upon the procedure required, area of interest and your medical history.

    This may include fasting (generally 4 hours), however this will be explained to you at the time of the booking.

  • DURING A FLUOROSCOPY SCAN

    Generally, you will be asked to remove any jewellery, or clothing with metal clips, zips or buttons as these show up on x-rays. If you need to remove any clothing you will be given a gown to wear. Depending on which test your doctor has requested a contrast agent may be given which is introduced through ingestion, an enema, or an injection through a vein, usually at the elbow. For some examinations, contrast is injected through a catheter inserted into the body part.

    Our staff will explain the procedure to you. You will be asked to lie on an x-ray table in a position that enables optimal visualisation of the area of interest, and you may be asked to hold your breath for a few seconds, to reduce movement. The length of the examination varies according to the type of type of procedure and the body part being examined, but you should expect to be with us for at least an hour.

  • AFTER A FLUOROSCOPY SCAN

    Post care is dependent upon the type of procedure. For many studies you can return to normal activities straight away, however, for some you may be required to arrange transport to and from your appointment. Any post-procedure care will be fully explained at the time of booking. You should contact your doctor if you notice any pain, redness, or swelling at the injection site as this could be an allergic reaction.

    One of our radiologists will interpret the scan and provide your referring doctor with a comprehensive report about the findings. The results of your scan will be sent directly to your referring doctor, and it is very important you book a timely follow-up appointment to discuss your results.

  • PATIENT SAFETY

    Because of the nature of this procedure, they are only performed our 2 hospital sites. Any risks involved with the procedure will be explained at the time of booking, and by our nurses on the day.

    As Fluoroscopy uses X-ray, our staff are highly trained to use the lowest radiation dose possible for high quality images, minimalizing radiation exposure and decreasing risks involved. The radiographer will only scan the area/s of concern, avoiding unnecessary exposure. The benefits of a fluoroscopy outweigh the risks involved.

    Pregnant patients should avoid having a fluoroscopy in order to avoid exposing the fetus to unnecessary radiation. The results of your scan will be sent directly to your referring Doctor, and it is very important you book a timely follow-up appointment to discuss your results.

Find out more about the services we offer in this area

Please note; not all services are listed below, and not all services are available at every site

Arthrogram

Arthrography assesses bony joints such as; the hip, shoulder, ankle or knee. Any excess joint fluid might be withdrawn with a needle before contrast media is injected. After the contrast is injected, the patient might be asked to move the joint around to evenly distribute the contrast within the joint.

Injecting contrast media and/or air into a joint space enables the radiologist to assess the cartilage, ligaments, tendons and other structures. Once the contrast has been introduced into the joint more detailed images are acquired using fluoroscopy, CT or MRI.

Patients will be instructed to cease any blood thinners, and arrange transportation to and from the appointment.

Barium Study

Barium studies enable the radiologist to assess the oesophagus, upper gastrointestinal tract and stomach and as the contrast (Barium) shows on X-ray.

Barium is a chalky mixture of which is swallowed by the patient. As this mixture slowly travels through the intestinal lining, X-rays are taken to allow the radiologist to identify areas of abnormality such as ulcers, inflammation or tumours.

Generally you will be required to fast for 4 hours prior to the appointment so food does not obstruct the view.

Cystogram

Cystogram is used to assess the outline of the bladder in patients who are suspected of having urinary reflux, which means urine in the bladder is passed back through the ureters in the wrong direction.

Contrast media that is visible on X-ray is introduced through a small catheter to outline the bladder. Most patients do not find the procedure painful, however my experience some discomfort during this process.

No special preparation is required for this exam, and you can return to usual daily activities straight after.

HSG

Hysterosalpingography is used to assess the female reproductive system in women with infertility. Contrast medium is injected into the uterus through a small catheter. The passage of contrast through the uterus and fallopian tubes is followed using fluoroscopy. The test will show the shape of the intrauterine cavity, the width of the fallopian tubes and any blockage or flow restriction.

There might be some discomfort as the fluid passes through the tubes. Sometimes, the passage of the fluid through the tubes is enough to clear debris and allow a pregnancy to occur.

HSG’s are best performed one (1) week after menstrual cycle but before ovulation.

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